Danish Police: gunman is Danish-born 22-year-old with criminal record

Islamic Extremism

Copenhagen shooting People look at flowers placed outside a synagogue where an attack took place in Copenhagen, Sunday, Feb. 15, 2015. Danish police shot and killed a man early Sunday suspected of carrying out shooting attacks at a free speech event and then at a Copenhagen synagogue, killing a Danish documentary filmmaker and a member of the Scandinavian country’s Jewish community. Five police officers were also wounded in the attacks. (AP Photo/Polfoto, Rumle Skafte)

A suspected gunman shot dead by Danish police near a train station in Norrebro, an area in Copenhagen not far from the sites where he is believed to have carried out two deadly attacks, has been identified, the commissioner for Copenhagen police Thorkild Fogde said on Sunday.

Fogde said the man was armed and one of his weapons may have been used in the first attack. One person died when the gunman attacked a cafe hosting an event attended by Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who has received death threats for depicting the Prophet Mohammad.

“It was the case that when the suspect was shot and killed during police action he was armed with pistols. The news is that we have found a weapon that we think could be the weapon used in the first shooting. We have also found some clothing that is now part of the investigation. We have also identified the perpetrator, we now know who the suspected perpetrator is and we will say more about that at a later stage,” Fogde said.

Danish authorities have been on alert since three Islamist gunmen killed 17 people in three days of violence in Paris last month that began with an attack on Charlie Hebdo, long known for its acerbic cartoons on Islam, other religions and politicians.

Denmark’s spy chief Jens Madsen, head of the Danish security and intelligence service (PET), said the gunman was known to the intelligence services prior to the shooting and probably acted alone. He did not elaborate.

“It’s a person who was known to us, so yes, it was a person on PET’s radar,” Madsen said

Like other European governments, Scandinavian leaders have been increasingly concerned about the radicalization of young Muslims travelling to Syria and Iraq to fight alongside violent jihadist groups such as Islamic State.

Madsen said that investigations were underway to determine whether the suspected gunman had traveled to Islamist hotspots.

“From our side we don’t know at the moment whether the perpetrator had been travelling to conflict zones, such as Syria and Iraq, but of course that is absolutely at the center of the investigation,” Madsen said.

Hours after attacking the cafe, the gunman killed a security guard at a synagogue. Five police officers were also wounded in the attacks.

Story complied with information from Reuters. 


Danish Police: gunman is Danish-born 22-year-old with criminal record

Danish police shot and killed the man suspected of carrying out this weekend’s twin attacks in Copenhagen.

Authorities say the 22-year-old opened fire during a seminar on free speech, and at a synagogue – killing two and wounding five.

CCTV’s Guy Henderson reported this story from Copenhagen.

Danish Police: gunman is Danish-born 22-year-old with criminal record

Danish police shot and killed the man suspected of carrying out this weekend’s twin attacks in Copenhagen. Authorities say the 22-year-old opened fire during a seminar on free speech, and at a synagogue – killing two and wounding five. CCTV’s Guy Henderson reported this story from Copenhagen.

Another European capital is in mourning.

At least several hundred must have come to Krystalgade Synagogue on Sunday.

Laying tributes for 37-year-old Dan Uzan – the security guard shot dead by a so far-unnamed attacker.

The prime minister went to express a deep sense of shock.

“We are devastated today. A man has lost his life in a service of that synagogue and we are devastated. Our thoughts go to his family. We are with them today,” Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said. “But our thoughts go to the whole of the Jewish community today. They belong in Denmark, they are strong part of our community. And we will do everything we can to protect the Jewish community in our country.”

Details have also emerged of the victim of the first attack during a debate about free speech.

55-year-old filmmaker Finn Norgaard was fatally wounded by the hail of bullets that came in broad-daylight without warning.

Police shot and killed the prime suspect at 5am Sunday morning.

Officials have identified him as 22 year old, born in Denmark, with a history of gang-related violence. But they won’t at this stage of their investigation reveal his name.

They did reveal he had been on their radar for some time.

Police have been praised for their quick response, but there may well be questions now around how this individual slipped through the net.

Officers carried out several other raids Sunday to find out whether he acted completely on his own Or whether he may have received any help from inside Denmark or abroad.

Sunday evening, Denmark’s Muslim community held a ceremony of condolence.

There is no stated motive for this crime as yet, but there is fear that this crime could sow division in Copenhagen, a usually tranquil city.


Kristian Mouritzen discusses Denmark’s ‘taste of terror’

CCTV America’s Susan Roberts interviewed journalist Kristian Mouritzen. He has experience working in Danish broadcasting and media and he discussed developments from the Copenhagen attacks.

Kristian Mouritzen discusses Denmark's 'taste of terror'

CCTV America's Susan Roberts interviewed journalist Kristian Mouritzen. He has experience working in Danish broadcasting and media and he discussed developments from the Copenhagen attacks.