Corruptour highlights the corruption of Monterrey

Americas Now

Corruptour highlights the corruption of Monterrey

At first glance, it may look like a big happy blue bus, like so many vehicles servicing the thousands of tourists that flock to Mexico every year. But this particular vehicle offers visitors a very unique experience.

“There is a tour of architecture in Chicago, and a ghost tour in Scotland;” explains Miguel Treviño, the man behind the wheel. “This is a tour about corruption where we try to explain the problems this issue is causing.” An economist in the city of Monterrey, Treviño grew increasingly wary of the flow of corruption cases popping every day in the headlines, until he decided to take matters into his own hands.

That is how the Corruptour came about. A free one-hour ride showing 11 corruption landmarks in this industrial city of 1,1 million people, the Corruptour’s route starts off at the Governmental Palace and includes visits to the Administrative Tower, ending at the ruins of the Casino Royale. All the while, the tour guide tells tales of over-priced government buildings, political leaders involved with crime organizations and the state’s public debt soaring to an unprecedented 5 million dollars.

After the success of this venture, Treviño claims to have received lots of calls from people all over Mexico who want to launch Corruptour in their own cities. He is happy to share his experience and believes it to be a sign that change is about to start. He is this week’s Game Changer on Americas Now.

Corruptour highlights the corruption of Monterrey

Corruptour highlights the corruption of Monterrey

At first glance, it may look like a big happy blue bus, like so many vehicles servicing the thousands of tourists that flock to Mexico every year. But this particular vehicle offers visitors a very unique experience.