Capsized ship in China’s Yangtze River righted

World Today

Eastern Star

Disaster teams that have recovered 82 bodies from a capsized cruise ship in the Yangtze River finished righting the previously overturned vessel on Friday to quicken the search for more than 360 other victims still missing. Chinese state media has lowered the death toll as of Friday to 331.

The operation started late Thursday to right the Eastern Star and shifted the focus from finding survivors from Monday night’s sudden capsizing in a severe storm to retrieving bodies. Friday morning the boat was righted and teams tried to lift the vessel even though the water inside it was weighing it down.

Related: How to right a capsized ship

Transport Ministry spokesman Xu Chengguang said earlier that the operation would involve divers putting steel bars underneath the ship, which would then be lifted by two 500-ton cranes. A huge net was placed near the cranes and another one a few meters (yards) downstream to catch any bodies.

Two smaller cranes were also on site and boats were stopped from entering the area.


Rod Sullivan discusses the disaster on the Yangtze

CCTV America interviewed maritime expert Rod Sullivan on the Yangtze River disaster.

Rod Sullivan discusses the disaster on the Yangtze

CCTV America interviewed maritime expert Rod Sullivan on the Yangtze River disaster.


The ship salvage processing on the Yangtze
China’s worst maritime disaster in 65 years is unfolding.CCTV America’s Jim Spellman reports on the operation.

The ship salvage processing on the Yangtze

China's worst maritime disaster in 65 years is unfolding. CCTV-America's Jim Spellman is monitoring the ship salvage.


Jim Staples on the recovery efforts
For more on the ship disaster, CCTV-America spoke to Captain Jim Staples. He is a maritime consultant.

Jim Staples on the recovery efforts

For more on the ship disaster, CCTV-America spoke to Captain Jim Staples. He is a maritime consultant.


‘Frogman’ rescuers: the heroes on the Yangtze
Despite all the pain and suffering, a number of stories about the brave acts of rescue workers who’ve risked their lives saving others have emerged.

CCTV-America’s Jin Yingqiao filed the report from Jianli, China.

'Frogman' rescuers: the heroes on the Yangtze

Despite all the pain and suffering, a number of stories about the brave acts of rescue workers who've risked their lives saving others have emerged.CCTV-America's Jin Yingqiao filed the report from Jianli, China.

Story compiled with information from The Associated Press.