Hurricane Katrina: Ten years after the storm

World Today

This NASA Earth Observatory image released August 28, 2015- ten years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall, shows the scars that still linger. Normal vegetation appears bright green and flood-damaged vegetation is brown. Water is dark blue. (AFP PHOTO/NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY)

It was one of the most devastating natural disasters in U.S. history. Ten years after Hurricane Katrina swept across the U.S. Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, the regions continues to recover. CCTV America traveled to New Orleans to talk to those who are still affected by the storm.

Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 years later

Now, a decade after the destruction, Correspondent John Zarrella returns to New Orleans, Louisiana and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, two of the cities hardest hit by Katrina. He speaks to residents, business owners and local politicians about the recovery and reconstruction process. Take a look back with us on the impact of this disaster and the area's efforts to revitalize as we remember the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

The city of New Orleans suffered enormous damage and loss of life from flooding after levees that were holding massive amounts of water gave way. More than 1,800 people were left dead and 1 million people were displaced. Nearly 80 percent of New Orleans was under water, and damages were estimated at $108 billion. Today, families there are still trying to recover.

Photos: Hurricane Katrina then and now
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READ MORE HURRICANE KATRINA COVERAGE


Hurricane Katrina 10 years on: The slow road home

Hurricane Katrina threatened to wipe New Orleans off the map and destroyed large parts of an area the size of Great Britain across the Gulf Coast. Many died, some were lucky enough to be airlifted from rooftops in this area. But the region and New Orleans did recover. But there are still many challenges, not just for the businesses who depend upon this unusual environment, but the people who live here. Un the Lower Ninth ward, one of the hardest hit areas of New Orleans where ten years on, some people still haven’t moved home. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough reports.

Hurricane Katrina 10 years on: The slow road home

It was one of the most devastating natural disasters in U.S. history. On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina swept across the U.S. Gulf Coast.


Two U.S. musicians build haven for low-income artists

After Hurricane Katrina, the non-profit organization, Habitat for Humanity, built a low cost neighborhood aimed at preserving a key element of the city’s culture.
Almost a decade, dozens of the homes are inhabited by musicians and a vibrant tradition continues. Food and music are arguably the heartbeat of New Orleans. Walk through a neighborhood like the French Quarter on any given day and you are likely smell fresh food and hear world famous jazz. CCTV America’s Bianca Davie reports:

Two US musicians build haven for low-income artists

Food and music are arguably the heartbeat of New Orleans. Walk through a neighborhood like the French Quarter on any given day and you are likely smell fresh food and hear world famous jazz.


Katrina 10 years on: U.S. fishing industry recovers

Gulf coast fishermen were among the first casualties of Katrina. Many have recovered their businesses, but they fear for the future. Coastal erosion has affected a third of the fishing grounds. Freshwater diversions intended to encourage new wetlands are diluting the saltwater-threatening the reproduction of species like sea trout. The reduced salinity is also affecting oyster farmers and shrimp fishermen who depend on the waters as part of an industry worth $2.5 billion a year, exporting their catch to increasingly consumer hungry countries like China. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough reports from New Orleans:

Katrina 10 years on: US fishing industry recovers

Gulf coast fishermen were among the first casualties of Katrina. Many have recovered their businesses, but they fear for the future, because of another hurricane. CCTV’s Owen Fairclough was in New Orleans for the tenth anniversary of the tragedy.


This week on Americas Now: New Orleans Revival

After a decade of struggle, the city has recovered and been revitalized. CCTV Correspondent John Zarrella returns to Louisiana and Missouri to talk to the hard-hit residents there about their efforts to win the battle against Katrina. Watch Americas Now, Sunday, Aug. 30 at 7pm EST on CCTV America. And you can also watch via your web connected device at: www.cctvamericalive.com


Experts discuss impact of Hurricane Katrina

One family remembers Hurricane Katrina. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough reports:

The Heat: Katrina anniversary

It was a massive hurricane with 127 mile-per-hour winds. Over 1,800 people were left dead with more than one million people displaced. 80% of New Orleans was under water. And damages were estimated at 108 billion dollars. Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina ripped through large parts of America’s Gulf Coast. Its scale was devastating. The city of New Orleans suffered enormous damage and loss of life from flooding after levees that were holding massive amounts of water gave way. Families there are still trying to recover. We begin with one such story and this report from CCTV’s Owen Fairclough.

The Heat interviewed experts about the impact of this devastating hurricane, ten years later. They include:

The Heat: Katrina anniversary- Pt 1

It was a massive hurricane with 127 mile-per-hour winds. Over 1,800 people were left dead with more than one million people displaced. 80% of New Orleans was under water. And damages were estimated at 108 billion dollars. To discuss the hurricane that devastated New Orleans and parts of America’s Gulf coast 10 years ago. The Heat spoke to Reverend Raymond Brown, Jeanne Meserve, Gary Rivlin and Richard Fowler.

The panel continues.

The Heat: Katrina anniversary- Pt 2

It was a massive hurricane with 127 mile-per-hour winds. Over 1,800 people were left dead with more than one million people displaced. 80% of New Orleans was under water. And damages were estimated at 108 billion dollars. To discuss the hurricane that devastated New Orleans and parts of America’s Gulf coast 10 years ago. The Heat spoke to Reverend Raymond Brown, Jeanne Meserve, Gary Rivlin and Richard Fowler.


R. C. Blakes, Jr. on 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

Saturday marked the tenth anniversary of hurricane Katrina coming ashore in southern states of the U.S. There was a wreath laying ceremony in New Orleans at a memorial for 163 unknown victims. Mayor Mitch Landrieu reminded people that these victims, although without the dignity of names, were not forgotten. They were just some of the more than 18-hundred deaths attributed to the category three storm. For more on Hurricane Katrina 10th anniversary, CCTV’ Susan Roberts spoke to R.C. Blakes, Jr. He is a regular teacher on World Harvest International Television Network.

R. C. Blakes, Jr. on 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

Saturday marked the tenth anniversary of hurricane Katrina coming ashore in southern states of the U.S. There was a wreath laying ceremony in New Orleans at a memorial for 163 unknown victims. Mayor Mitch Landrieu reminded people that these victims, although without the dignity of names, were not forgotten. They were just some of the more than 18-hundred deaths attributed to the category-three storm. For more on Hurricane Katrina 10th anniversary, CCTV' Susan Roberts spoke to R.C. Blakes, Jr. He is a regular teacher on World Harvest International Television Network.