Mexico’s Muxes don’t self-identify as transgender, but as third gender

World Today

In a country where gender discrimination is widespread, the Southern Mexico town of Juchitan is home to a group of people who break gender definitions and are accepted. Muxes, as they are called, have been accepted by the indigenous Zapotec community.

Juchitan is known as the home of Muxes. The local indigenous population long ago accepted a third gender, residents who go against gender norms and have become an indispensable part of the economy. They fit into society there and work as anything from hair stylists to shop keepers and traders.

Muxes are born male but dress and behave in ways associated with the female gender.

Juchitan is a city run by women. Muxes here have won respect because of their participation in the local economy. The Muxes even have a local celebration that draws an international crowd.

There is still discrimination and violence against Muxes, though. In the last five years, five Muxes have been killed. Muxes still have a long way to go before they’re completely accepted.

CCTV’s Martin Markovits reports from Mexico City.

A transgender group in Mexico, known as the Muxes

A transgender group in Mexico, known as the Muxes

In a country where gender discrimination is widespread, the Southern Mexico town of Juchitan is home to a group of people who break gender definitions and are accepted. Muxes, as they are called, have been accepted by the indigenous Zapotec community.