China’s Bama County said to have healing longevity powers

Insight

Residents in Bama County, in southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region believe they’ve found the key to good health and a long life.

When you visit Bama you don’t need to take medicine, all you have to do is breathe the clean air, drink the local water, and sing and dance in front of the Baimo cave.

Before your skepticism creeps in, consider that 82 people here claim to be over the age of 100, much higher than the average worldwide.

CCTV’s Yin Hang reports from Bama County.

China's Bama County said to have healing longevity powers

China's Bama County said to have healing longevity powers

Residents in Bama County, in southwest China's Guanxi Zhuang Autonomous Region believe they've found the key to good health and a long life.
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Today about 200,000 so-called health migrants now live here, almost the same number as the local population.

It’s said the water here is clean and rich in minerals, and especially alkaline, and is good for people’s immune system.

For many, the daily routine includes a visit to the Panyang river, where they swim, bathe, and drink the water.

Tests have shown that the air here has a high concentration of negative oxygen ions, higher than in most Chinese cities. Negative oxygen ions increases oxygen to the brain and energizes the body.

Whether or not there is evidence of Bama’s ability to heal, is irrelevant to many people who live here. With or without proof, they’re convinced that there’s something about this place that brings them good health.


Professor Stephen Kritchevsky discusses the keys to longevity

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Professor Stephen Kritchevsky discusses the keys to longevity

Professor Stephen Kritchevsky discusses the keys to longevity

Professor Stephen Kritchevsky discusses the keys to longevity Stephen Kritchevsky, a professor and the director of the Sticht Center on Aging at the Wake Forest School of Medicine about how to live longer.
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