NATO initiates plan to stem migrant flow across the Aegean

World Today

Every day nearly 2,000 migrants make the dangerous journey by sea into Europe, afraid and desperate for survival.

That’s nearly 10 times the number of migrants making the crossing than a year ago. There’s now a plan to try to stem this surge and to potentially save lives in the process.

CCTV America’s Mike Walter reports.

NATO initiates plan to stem migrant flow across the Aegean

Afraid and desperate for survival. Each and every day nearly two thousand migrants make dangerous journeys by sea into Europe. That's nearly ten times the average from a year ago. Now, a new plan to try to stem the surge, and potentially save lives in the process. CCTV America's Mike Walter reports. Since the start of the year, the International Organization for Migration estimates that more than 70-thousand migrants and refugees have made this same journey. More than 300 others died trying. Late last week, NATO's Supreme Allied Commander announced a new mission. Several vessels immediately set out for the Aegean Sea. NATO is trying to identify the smugglers behind these boats. Right now, the only thing they know for sure is the route refugees and migrants are taking. It starts with an escape from Syria, into Turkey. Then they set out on the Aegean Sea headed for the Greek islands. From Greece migrants head for Germany and other parts of Europe. Other refugees and migrants are making this same trek from places like Afghanistan, Iraq and Eritrea. Could NATO's mission extend beyond the Aegean Sea? That's up for debate. Aircraft from Saudi Arabia are now arriving at Turkey's Incirlik air base. Saudi Arabia says that it is prepared to send ground troops into Syria if NATO or the U.S.-led coalition does too.

Since the beginning of the year, the International Organization for Migration estimates that more than 70,000 migrants and refugees have made this journey.

More than 300 others died trying.

In response to the refugee and migrant crisis, NATO’s supreme allied commander announced a new mission to identify smugglers. Currently, they only know the routes migrants and refugees take: first from Syria to Turkey, then to the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, finally to Germany or other European countries. Similar treks begin in Afghanistan, Iraq, or Eritrea.

But could NATO’s mission extend beyond the Aegean Sea?

Saudi Arabia said it’s prepared to send ground troops into Syria if NATO or the U.S.-led coalition does too, and sent aircraft to Turkey’s Incirlik air base.


Kurt Volker on the impact of NATO’s presence

NATO hopes its presence will not only make smuggling harder, but that it will eventually end human trafficking across the Aegean. How realistic is that? And how exactly will this mission work?

Kurt Volker Spoke to CCTV about the impact of NATO’s presence. Kurt Volker is the former U.S. ambassador to NATO. He’s now Executive Director of the McCain Institute for International Leadership at Arizona State University.

Kurt Volker on the impact of NATO's presence

NATO's hope is that its presence will make smuggling harder. And eventually bring people trafficking across the Aegean to an end. How realistic is that? And how exactly will this mission work? Kurt Volker Spoke to CCTV about the impact of NATO's presence. Kurt Volker is the former U.S. ambassador to NATO. He's now Executive Director of the McCain Institute for International Leadership at Arizona State University.


Security policy analyst Kamran Bokhari on the cease-fire in Syria

Kamran Bokhari on the Syrian cease-fire

CCTV America's Mike Walter spoke with security policy analyst Kamran Bokhari about the cease-fire in Syria, why hospitals and schools are being targeted, and Tukey's accusations that Russia has committed war crimes. Bokhari is a Fellow with the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, and he's also a senior lecturer at the Security and Policy Institute at the University of Ottawa. He joined us from Toronto.

CCTV America’s Mike Walter spoke with security policy analyst Kamran Bokhari about the cease-fire in Syria, why hospitals and schools are being targeted, and Tukey’s accusations that Russia has committed war crimes. Bokhari is a Fellow with the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, and he’s also a senior lecturer at the Security and Policy Institute at the University of Ottawa.