Swing states such as Virginia are a key battleground in 2016 election

World Today

The latest election poll released Tuesday has found that former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is still in the lead, but challenger U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is just ten points behind. On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump has a big lead over Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz. So-called “swing states” will play a big role in determining the next president.

CCTV America’s Jessica Stone reports from Alexandria, Virginia.

Swing states such as Virginia are a key battleground in 2016 election

The latest election poll released Tuesday has found that former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is still in the lead, but challenger U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is just ten points behind. On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump has a big lead over Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz. So-called "swing states" will play a big role in determining the next president. CCTV America's Jessica Stone reports from Alexandria, Virginia. Northern Virginia has twice predicted who American voters will elect for president. We went to near by Loudoun County to find out why. At this coffee shop, shoe-repair has given way to lattes and conversation. The cafe is located in what was once a cobbler's shop. Loudoun County's technology boom has brought thousands of new families. More than half are ethnic minorities. Voters who were once reliably conservative and Republican are now willing to listen to more progressive ideas. This makes the region ideal for presidential candidates who want a chance to convince truly open-minded voters. "I would have to imagine it's almost fun being such a minority in Loudoun County because both parties want you on their side so desperately," Loudoun Times Reporter Trevor Baratko said. Giving those minority communities a political voice is important to county resident Jewan Tiwari, who is originally from Nepal. "It would definitely make our country, our state better. That was the whole motivation for me running for election for myself, so I can bring a fresh voice," Tiwari said. As those fresh voices mix with traditional ones, Loudoun County will continue to tell us more about the changing direction of American politics. After Super Tuesday, political observers will be dissecting the voter data in Loudoun County for more insights into where the country may be headed in the presidential election.

Northern Virginia has twice predicted who American voters will elect for president. We went to near by Loudoun County to find out why.

Virginia voter: Ken Zakluliewicz

Ken Zakluliewicz, Trump supporter

CCTV America's Jessica Stone interviewed voters in Virginia, a swing state about the candidates and issues they care about.

At this coffee shop, shoe-repair has given way to lattes and conversation. The cafe is located in what was once a cobbler’s shop.

Loudoun County’s technology boom has brought thousands of new families. More than half are ethnic minorities.

Virginia voter: Evie Florek

Evie Florek, Bernie supporter

CCTV America's Jessica Stone interviewed voters in Virginia, a swing state about the candidates and issues they care about.

Voters who were once reliably conservative and Republican are now willing to listen to more progressive ideas.

This makes the region ideal for presidential candidates who want a chance to convince truly open-minded voters.

Virginia voter: John Williams

John Williams, Clinton supporter

CCTV America's Jessica Stone interviewed voters in Virginia, a swing state about the candidates and issues they care about.

“I would have to imagine it’s almost fun being such a minority in Loudoun County because both parties want you on their side so desperately,” Loudoun Times Reporter Trevor Baratko said.

Giving those minority communities a political voice is important to county resident Jewan Tiwari, who is originally from Nepal.

Virginia voter: Shawrieka Gregory

Shawrieka Gregory, Virginia voter

CCTV America's Jessica Stone interviewed voters in Virginia, a swing state about the candidates and issues they care about.

“It would definitely make our country, our state better. That was the whole motivation for me running for election for myself, so I can bring a fresh voice,” Tiwari said.

As those fresh voices mix with traditional ones, Loudoun County will continue to tell us more about the changing direction of American politics.

After Super Tuesday, political observers will be dissecting the voter data in Loudoun County for more insights into where the country may be headed in the presidential election.