Diversity, change comes to comicbook industry

Global Business

When one thinks of superheroes, Iron Man, Superman, Batman and Spiderman come to mind.

Diversity, change comes to comicbook industry

When one thinks of superheroes, Iron Man, Superman, Batman and Spiderman come to mind. The ones that dominate Hollywood's box-office have been almost always been men and almost always white. Rarely have they been women or minorities, but the comic book landscape may be changing.

The ones that dominate Hollywood’s box-office have been almost always been men and almost always white. Rarely have they been women or minorities, but the comic book landscape may be changing.

The traditional superhero is changing face now. In 2011, Marvel Comics unveiled the new Spiderman: Miles Morales, a half-black, half-Hispanic teenager. And last year Sam Wilson, the African American superhero known as the Falcon became the new Captain America.

But it’s not just minorities becoming more prominent in the super hero universe.

In 2013, Kamala Khan, a teenage Pakistani-American girl with shape-shifting abilities became the new Misss Marvel.

It was one of the first efforts by a major comic book publisher to provide a window into the American Muslim experience.


Sana Amanat on the growing influence of women in comic books

Sana Amanat is one of the people pushing for a cultural shift in the superhero universe. Also, she’s the director of content and character development at Marvel Comics.

CCTV America’s Shraysi Tandon sat down with Sana Amanat to talk about the growing influence of women in comic books.