Tech companies team up to produce smart vehicles

Global Business

Tech companies team up to produce smart vehicles

The race to become the first to market a self-driving car is accelerating with everyone from Google, Tesla and even Uber getting in on the action.

The Holy Grail is called Level 5 where people could eat, read a book or even sleep while the car takes over.

And as CCTV America’s Mark Niu reports, a new partnership between auto tech companies Delphi and Mobileye is helping to fuel the autonomous movement.

Tech companies team up to produce smart vehicles

Tech companies team up to produce smart vehicles

The race to become the first to market a self-driving car is accelerating with everyone from Google, Tesla and even Uber getting in on the action.The Holy Grail is called Level 5 where people could eat, read a book or even sleep while the car takes over.CCTV America’s Mark Niu reports
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Auto software company Delphi has joined forces with computer vision company Mobileye to accelerate toward an industry goal which is a full-fledged working autonomous driving system by 2019.

And it is the very latest Delphi, Mobileye-equipped vehicle with an HD camera and a Mobileye camera. In the front, light ranging and detecting sensors, radar behind the license plate. Also a camera right. Two more cameras will go along each side very soon. And right in the back– Lidar and radar right in the center.

With a twist of the knob, drivers enter autonomous mode. That is what the car sees – the color of the traffic lights, X’s that indicate obstacles, crosswalks with green mean empty, red occupied.

The system knows its location within 10 centimeters and that’s without GPS.

Watching the driver with his hands off the wheel can be nerve-wracking, especially when a bus edges into our lane. The car’s algorithms are “learning” judgment.

As road work approaches, the car flashes its blinker to change lanes. But drivers don’t want to give way and a harsh sun affects both human and computer vision.

The driver decides to take over manually. On the 10 kilometer drive on both surface roads and highways, the driver had to take the wheel just two times.

The finish line for fully-autonomous driving appears to be in sight, though getting there will require a machine to think a little more human.


Glen De Vos talks about self-driving car system

CCTV America’s Mark Niu spoke with Glen De Vos, Delphi’s vice president of Business Services to learn more about their work in self-driving cars. De Vos began by showing Mark the brains behind their self-driving unit that the company hopes to sell to auto manufacturers.