What does a day in the life of an NPC deputy look like?

Latest News

NPC 2 Among the responsibilities of National People’s Congress (NPC) deputies, are making proposals, motions, and bills for the top legislature to consider.

Among the responsibilities of National People’s Congress (NPC) deputies, are making proposals, motions, and bills for the top legislature to consider.
These can be about the economy, jobs, the environment, and so on.

CGTN’s Han Peng follows an NPC deputy for a day, for a glimpse into China’s decision-making process.

A day in the life of an NPC deputy

A day in the life of an NPC deputy

Among the responsibilities of National People's Congress (NPC) deputies, are making proposals, motions, and bills for the top legislature to consider. CGTN's Han Peng follows an NPC deputy for a day, for a glimpse into China's decision-making process.
Download Video

Its eight o’clock in the morning and NPC deputy Yu Chun is already preparing for her speech.

She just retired after 30 years as a bus driver.

She says in her hometown Hangzhou, passengers no longer need to whip out cash for their bus fares. They can simply pay through their unique QR codes on their mobile phones.

“This year, I will propose to the National People’s Congress to start building a ‘cash-free country,’ by making mobile payment available in all the businesses and in all places, just like on the buses in Hangzhou.”

The popularity of mobile payment apps like Alipay swept across the country since the end of 2014.

Yu spent years doing field research, and continues to do so even as she is on her way to the panel discussion.

“Just now I was refused from paying on mobile. But we understand their concern. These shops won’t use a convenient way of payment because they fear the money cannot be transferred safely. We need to improve mobile payment security,” she said.

At nine in the morning, the Panel discussion begins.

Yu’s primary purpose is to get her proposal included in the government work report.

Premier Li Keqiang delivered the draft report to all 3,000 deputies on March 5th. And it’s now being deliberated by deputies divided into small panels such as this one.

Last year, a total of 61 changes made their way into the final draft after the two-week deliberation.

Other deputies, like Shen Qifang, also seem equally vocal about their own causes.

“Throughout the government report, I did not see a single mention of improving education for farmers. I strongly suggest that the final draft include this issue.”

During the NPC session, all deputies have the right to speak freely without fear of backlash, allowing them to be tough when they feel something is not right.

Yu’s strategy is to get as much support as she can from other deputies.

After the morning session end, Yu collects signatures from other deputies.

She does not hesitate to reach out to high-ranking officials and renowned professors.

“We are all deputies representing our groups. No matter who they are outside the panel, we are all equal, and I must seize the chance to make our voices heard.”

For Yu, utilizing the media is another tactic to get her voice heard.

The afternoon session sees an even bigger panel, in which Vice Premier Liu Yandong is also present.

Before the final voting day on March 15th, Yu, like all other deputies, will try their best to get their proposals written into the government work report.

But what if Yu’s proposal doesn’t make it the final cut There’s no giving up for her – she says she will refine it and try again next year.