US gov’t temporarily prohibits some electronics on certain flights

Global Business

Soon, passengers on flights from some Muslim majority countries will be forced to store large electronic devices in checked baggage, not in the cabin if they’re going to the United States.

The rule applies to just about any electronic device larger than a smart phone —gadgets like tablets and laptop computers.

And now the United Kingdom has announced its own ban.

CGTN’s Jim Spellman reports.

US gov't temporarily prohibits some electronics on certain flights

US gov't temporarily prohibits some electronics on certain flights

Soon, passengers on flights from some Muslim majority countries will be forced to store large electronic devices in checked baggage, not in the cabin if they're going to the United States. The rule applies to just about any electronic device larger than a smart phone ---gadgets like tablets and laptop computers. And now the United Kingdom has announced its own ban. CGTN's Jim Spellman reports.
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The new procedures will affect about 50 flights a day bound for the U-S. The rules apply to all airlines, but no U.S. carriers fly nonstop from those airports to the United States. The U.S. said the change is driven by new intelligence.

“Terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation and are aggressive in pursuing innovative methods to undertake their attacks to include smuggling an explosive device in various consumer objects. Based on this information the Secretary of Homeland Security and the TSA administrator have determined that it’s necessary to enhance security procedures for passengers at certain last point of departure airports,” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said.

U.S. officials won’t provide more details about the intelligence that led to the change in flight procedures. Many security experts said it’s the right move.

“As a security expert, I think it is a right decision to have one less headache to be concerned in security wise related to aviation, so I support that decision, to have all electrical devices on the luggage, not onboard,” said Jamil al-Qsous, former Jordanian aviation security official.

The new requirements go into effect Saturday.


Michael Planey discusses implications of electronics ban

To find out an expert’s perspective on the electronic ban in U.S. flights, CGTN’s Mike Walter spoke to Airline Technology Consultant Michael Planey.