Brazil’s meat ban makes way for growing vegetable sales

Global Business

The recent crackdown on corruption has shaken many industries. A recent investigation into the selling of tainted meat rocked international markets.

But while the beef sector took a beating, demand for meatless alternatives jumped.

CGTN’s Lucrecia Franco reports.

Brazil's meat ban makes way for growing vegetable sales

The recent crackdown on corruption has shaken many industries. A recent investigation into the selling of tainted meat rocked international markets. But while the beef sector took a beating, demand for meatless alternatives jumped. CGTN’s Lucrecia Franco reports.

It is one of Brazil’s biggest economic engines and is back in the game after a meatpacking probe in mid-March banned companies accused of selling tainted beef. The meat scandal however was welcomed by the Brazilian Vegetarian Society that says it boosted searches for their 21- day meatless program.

“The demand for our 21-day program rose 250 times and it was a great surprise. We were expecting a surge, but not of such magnitude,” Dr. Fernanda de Luca, member of the Brazilian Vegetarian Society said.

Sales for kebabs, skewers and burgers made from mushrooms rose. Chickpeas and quinoa are also selling fast at a new vegan business in Rio. The best seller is a Jackfruit snack that resembles one of Brazil’s most popular meaty appetizers. Though there is no recent data, the last survey conducted by pollster Ibope in 2012, said nearly 15.2 million Brazilians were vegetarians or vegans but the trend seems to be on the rise.

But even vegetarians said it will not be easy for carnivorous Brazilians to switch their diet, with or without any meat scandal.


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