People, organizations react to latest Charlie Hebdo cover

World Today

Council on American-Islamic Relations objects to Charlie Hebdo cover

In the U.S., the nonprofit Council on American-Islamic Relations spoke out about the new Charlie Hebdo magazine cover. Nihad Awad executive director of the council said that, just as Charlie Hebdo has the right to publish, they also have the right to peacefully challenge negative portrayals of Muslims.

Council on American-Islamic Relations objects to Charlie Hebdo cover

In the U.S., the nonprofit Council on American-Islamic Relations spoke out about the new Charlie Hebdo magazine cover. Nihad Awad executive director of the council said that, just as Charlie Hebdo has the right to publish, they also have the right to peacefully challenge negative portrayals of Muslims.


South African cartoonist inspired by support for Charlie Hebdo

Internationally renowned cartoonist Jonathan Shapiro from South Africa, who’s pen name is Zapiro, said what happened to his fellow cartoonists and their colleagues in the Charlie Hebdo killings hcrossed a line when it comes to freedom of speech around the world. CCTV’s Rene del Carme reported this story from Cape Town, South Africa.

South African cartoonist inspired by support for Charlie Hebdo

Internationally renowned cartoonist Jonathan Shapiro from South Africa, who's pen name is Zapiro, said what happened to his fellow cartoonists and their colleagues in the Charlie Hebdo killings hcrossed a line when it comes to freedom of speech around the world. CCTV's Rene del Carme reported this story from Cape Town, South Africa.

“This is an unbelievable attack on everything that I suppose that I stand for, including the freedom of expression, satire, cartooning and freedom of the press, secular society. Of course, individual cartoonists like myself who have been trying to push the the boundaries. They push really, really hard, and they have a particular way of doing it. They were just murdered in cold blood,” Zapiro said.

Zapiro said he penned a cartoon about the killing this past weekend, to show empathy for the people gunned down and to be part of the global solidarity for freedom and satire. As one of the most controversial cartoonists in South Africa, he’s faced multi-million dollar lawsuits for some of his cartoons depicting South African President Jacob Zuma. The cases against him were eventually dropped, but Zapiro is adamant that he will continue pushing boundaries in his work, in the name of freedom of speech and tolerance.

“The group solidarity is pushing things in one direction, but the individual’s decision as to how far to go, that’s going to be key for each person. How much self-censorship do you allow, and where are you prepare to take things? That is where this thing has pushed us,” Zapiro said.


Scott Libin of University of Minnesota discusses satire publishing

CCTV America interviewed Scott Libin a journalism professor at the University of Minnesota about whether there should be on satire, and whether there is a double standard among those who defend Charlie Hebdo.

Scott Libin of University of Minnesota discusses satire publishing

CCTV America interviewed Scott Libin a journalism professor at the University of Minnesota about whether there should be on satire, and whether there is a double standard among those who defend Charlie Hebdo.