India and US break deadlock on civil nuclear deal

World Today

India and the United States have reached a landmark civil nuclear deal. It was announced by U.S. President Barack Obama and India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi. The pact will give U.S. companies access to India’s massive nuclear energy market.
CCTV’s Shweta Bajaj reported this story from New Delhi, India.

After President Obama stepped off the plane, he was met by Prime Minister Modi who broke protocol to meet the President himself. During their meeting, the two countries ironed out the details of a civil nuclear agreement.

India and US break deadlock on civil nuclear deal

India and the United States have reached a landmark civil nuclear deal. It was announced by U.S. President Barack Obama and India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi. The pact will give U.S. companies access to India's massive nuclear energy market. CCTV's Shweta Bajaj reported this story from New Delhi.

“I am pleased that six years after we signed our bilateral agreement, we are moving towards commercial cooperation, consistent with our law, our international legal obligations, and technical and commercial viability,” Prime Minister Modi said.

India and U.S. signed a civil nuclear agreement in 2008, but it was never put into effect.

The breakthrough came after President Obama gave up on demands to monitor the nuclear reactors installed by U.S. companies in India. India referred to the demand as intrusive. The deadlock in the Civil Nuclear Deal was the biggest point of contention between U.S. and India.

“Today we achieved a breakthrough understanding on two issues that were holding up our ability to advance our civil nuclear cooperation and we are committed to moving towards full implementation and this is an important step that shows how we can work together to elevate our relationship,” President Obama said.

Defense cooperation deals were also reached during the meetings.

India and the U.S. decided to renew their defense agreement for another 10 years. Both countries will jointly develop and manufacture defense equipment.

The two countries decided to establish a strategic partnership to combat terrorism and share more information while agreeing to be partners in the Asia Pacific region.

President Obama said, “We have also agreed to a new vision for the Asia Pacific so that we are doing more together to advance our shared security and prosperity in this critical region.”

Obama supported India’s bid for a permanent seat at the United Nations Security Council in return, he received a commitment from India to develop a climate change deal.


Lalit Jha discusses President Obama\'s visit to New Delhi, US-India relations

CCTV America's Susan Roberts interviewed Chief U.S. Correspondent for the Press Trust of India Lalit Jha. He discussed how President Obama's visit to New Delhi will impact the future of US-India relations.