National Geographic program shows resurgence of underground bunkers

Insight

Sixty-four years after the Cold War initiative “Duck and Cover” was implemented, a new generation of survivalists have emerged. CCTV America’s Mike Walters reported this story from Washington, D.C.

National Geographic program shows resurgence of underground bunkers

Sixty-four years after the Cold War initiative "Duck and Cover" was implemented, a new generation of survivalists have emerged. CCTV America's Mike Walters reported this story from Washington, D.C.

The United States, the U.K., the Soviet Union and other nations have all built underground bunkers in fear of nuclear war. American schoolchildren became familiar with “Bert the Turtle” as the mascot for what to do in the event of a bombing.

But bunkers aren’t just a relic of the Cold War, people are building them today. U.S. television programs, such “Doomsday Preppers” on the National Geographic Channel, feature real people, spending tens of thousands of dollars to prepare for the worst.

There are magazines and websites, dedicated to sharing tips and must-have essentials. Some lists of essentials included water storage tanks, an axe, machete sharpener, and a list of the best 37 foods to hoard.