Demonstrations around Argentina a month after suspicious death

World Today

Demonstrators poured into the streets of Buenos Aires one month after the shocking death of Argentinian special prosecutor Alberto Nisman to honor him. Nisman had been investigating the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires and accused the president of a cover-up. 

The circumstances surrounding his death are still unclear, and Wednesday’s march came as the mood in Argentina has become increasingly tense. CCTV America’s Joel Richards filed this report from Buenos Aires.

Demonstrations around Argentina a month after suspicious death

Demonstrations around Argentina a month after suspicious death

Demonstrators poured into the streets of Buenos Aires one month after the shocking death of Argentinian special prosecutor Alberto Nisman to honor him. Nisman had been investigating the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires and accused the president of a cover-up. The circumstances surrounding his death are still unclear, and Wednesday's march came as the mood in Argentina has become increasingly tense. CCTV America's Joel Richards filed this report from Buenos Aires.

Rain didn’t keep the thousands of protesters who marched in Argentina’s capital and other cities in the country in solidarity with Alberto Nisman who died under suspicious circumstances.

Members of the political opposition took part in the demonstrations while President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner was not seen in Buenos Aires that day.

The march began in front of the National Congress and ended in Plaza de Mayo in front of the Presidential building known as the Casa Rosada, or the Pink House.

The families of the 85 victims of the AMIA Jewish center bombing, which Nisman had been investigating, were notably absent from the crowds. They, and other rights groups, have been critical of the prosecutors who had called this march.

The anti-government sentiments expressed at the demonstrations had many wondering what impact the march might have in an election year. Analysts at the think tank Carta Abierta said it wouldn’t have much of an impact.

“This march won’t be a determining factor in the electoral year. It is used as a hammer by the media, but it does not have political strength, because of the scattered nature of the political opposition,” Alejandro Mezzadrid of Carta Abierta said.