Why the Chinese navy’s port visit to the US is important

Insight

Jinan Guided missile destroyer Jinan arrives at U.S. Naval station Mayport for port visit despite South China Sea tensions. Photo: Nathan King / CCTV America

In early November three Chinese ships docked on the east coast of the U.S.- Here’s why that matters.

U.S. officials are calling this port of call visit routine, and in a way, that is what both navies want this sort of exchange to be. It’s meant to put strategy differences aside when it come to the South China Sea, and work on common problems when it comes to the world’s oceans.

There was a real sense of excitement as this port visit got underway – partly because it was the first time the Chinese navy has made a port call to the Eastern U.S., but also because these types of visit are a welcome relief from the tensions in the South China Sea.

There was also a real sense of pride among Chinese and Chinese Americans that these ships are on a world tour after operating in the dangerous waters off the coast of Somalia- several sailors had stories of facing down Somali pirates.

The ships and their mission are also indicative of China’s establishment of a world-class navy that can patrol international waters on international missions and contribute to the global commons and international law.

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Port visit builds bonds between the Chinese, US navies 

Port visit builds bonds between the Navy of China and US

Port visit builds bonds between the Navy of China and US

For the first time, three Chinese ships are docked on the east coast of the U.S. The Jinan missile destroyer, one of three People’s Liberation Army ships docked for the first time in the Eastern United States on a world tour showing China is establishing a world class navy.

“It is the first time that ships from the The People’s Liberation Army Navy have visited Mayport, but visits from navies of other nations is not at all uncommon. We also have a ship from the Brazilian navy that’s currently in Mayport,” said U.S. Navy Commander Mike Andrews. “So in a way even though this is the first time, this has happened we treat this as a routine visit.”


Christopher Yung on US-China military ties
CCTV America’s Mike Walter spoke to Christopher Yung. He is the Donald Bren Chair of Non-Western Strategic Thought at Marine Corps University.

Christopher Yung on US-China military ties

Christopher Yung on US-China military ties

For more on the U.S.-China military ties, CCTV America's Mike Walter spoke to Christopher Yung. He is the Donald Bren Chair of Non-Western Strategic Thought, Marine Corps University.