Paris ‘piano man’ offers way to grieve after attacks

World Today

There is a man in Paris who bikes through the street and a piano trailing behind. His name is David Martello which is a man of few words. He lets his music do the talking, while Paris faces deep sorrow after the recent terror attacks.

CCTV’s Frances Kuo reports.

Paris 'piano man' offers way to grieve after attacks

Paris 'piano man' offers way to grieve after attacks

There is a man in Paris who bikes through the street and a piano trailing behind. His name is David Martello which is a man of few words. He lets his music do the talking, while Paris faces deep sorrow after the recent terror attacks. CCTV's Frances Kuo reports.

  • Lemmuel Odjay

    This would lead to people withdrawing into their shells. It would also generate a lasting climate of fear, hatred and lack of trust among the people of the world.

    Obviously, decades of efforts at integration has not worked and that means immigration policies would have to change drastically. For example, one policy that grants citizenship by birth or length of stay in one’s host country may have to be dropped as that has clearly not changed the orientation of most of the beneficiaries.

    I recall that during the reign of the Tony Blair-led Labour government in the UK, the then Home secretary, David Blunkett, had an unsuccessful run trying to wean the descendants of Moslem migrants born in Britain, off some of the traditions they inherited from their parents perceived to be detrimental to cohabitation with the larger society and to imbibe instead British fundamental social values. That move failed, and the evidence today is that children from such background rather than adapt still preferred to cling on to the socio-religious values of their fathers. Some of these are those been fingered today for aiding the jihadists in the Western hemisphere…