Key opposition group will attend Syria peace talks, but not negotiate

World Today

The first Syria peace talks in two years officially began at U.N. offices in Geneva, but there is a lot of uncertainty.

The largest opposition coalition had said they wouldn’t attend, as they were more concerned with fending off a renewed government military offensive, including increased airstrikes by Russia.

Now they’re coming, but insist they still won’t negotiate with the Syrian government.

Some reports estimate 300,000 have been killed in the five year civil war.

Millions have left their homes, creating the worst refugee crisis in decades.

CCTV America’s Jack Barton reports.

Key opposition group will attend Syria peace talks, but not negotiate

The first Syria peace talks in two years officially began at U.N. offices in Geneva, but there is a lot of uncertainty. The largest opposition coalition had said they wouldn’t attend, as they were more concerned with fending off a renewed government military offensive, including increased airstrikes by Russia. Now they’re coming, but insist they still won’t negotiate with the Syrian government. Some reports estimate 300,000 have been killed in the five year civil war. Millions have left their homes, creating the worst refugee crisis in decades. CCTV America’s Jack Barton reports.


CCTV America’s Asieh Namdar spoke to former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Theodore Kattouf.

Ambassador Theodore Kattouf on UN brokered talks

In Geneva, peace talks on the future of Syria started, but there is a lot of uncertainty. After refusing to attend at first, the main opposition group now says it will send a small delegation to the U.N.-sponsored talks. Some reports estimate 300,000 have been killed in the five year civil war. And, millions have left their homes, creating the worst refugee crisis in decades. CCTV America's Asieh Namdar spoke to former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Theodore Kattouf.