Skin patch could advance diabetes treatment options

Insight

Diabetes treatment could soon be revolutionized, thanks to a simple patch.

Scientists in South Korea are developing a skin patch, which tests glucose levels in sweat, instead of blood. At the same time, it delivers drugs painlessly through micro needles that are too short to touch nerves.

CCTV’s Jack Barton reports from Seoul.

Skin patch could advance diabetes treatment options

Diabetes treatment could soon be revolutionized, thanks to a simple patch. Scientists in South Korea are developing a skin patch, which tests glucose levels in sweat, instead of blood. At the same time, it delivers drugs painlessly through micro needles that are too short to touch nerves. CCTV's Jack Barton reports from Seoul.

The new high tech patch could enable diabetics to monitor blood sugar levels and receive insulin painlessly. Instead of blood the patch checks perspiration for glucose and PH levels, sending the information to a smartphone app.

“If the application judges that the person needs medication then micro needles embedded within the patch deliver the drug,” Jack Barton of Seoul National University said.

The device is being developed at Seoul National University by a team of researchers.

Trials on mice and two men have been successful and more prototypes are being made to test under more challenging conditions. If the prototype proves successful the patch could be commercially available within a few years. It’s expected to cost about the same as a conventional diagnostics and treatment kit, which would be good news for millions of diabetics worldwide.

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Dr. Daniel Moore on Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes is growing. Last year, there were an estimated 415 million diabetics globally. In 2040, that’s expected to grow to 642 million. CCTV America’s Elaine Reyes spoke to Dr. Daniel Moore, assistant professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University.

Dr. Daniel Moore on Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes is growing. Last year, there were an estimated 415 million diabetics globally. In 2040, that's expected to grow to 642 million. CCTV America's Elaine Reyes spoke to Dr. Daniel Moore, assistant professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University.