Young Cuban Fishermen Talk About their Nation’s Future

Cuba

With the death of Fidel Castro, many Cubans are reflecting on the achievements and challenges their society faces.

Young Cubans in particular, those between the ages of 20 and 34, are expressing interest in their nation’s future.

In Cojimar, Cuba, people of all ages have a long-standing relationship with the bounty of the sea. People here make their living as fishermen.

For more, CCTV America’s Franc Contreras reports.

Young Cubans look to fishing industry to help nation's future

In Cojimar, Cuba, people of all ages have a long-standing relationship with the bounty of the sea. People here make their living as fishermen. For more, CCTV America's Franc Contreras reports.

Ernest Hemingway came here often seeking inspiration before writing his novel, “The Old Man and the Sea.”

Young Cuban men continue that tradition. 29-year-old Gabriel Rama owns this small fishing boat, he calls “Tito.” Rama has a wife and two daughters.

With a wife and two daughters, he said it’s hard for a fisherman to make a living in Cuba.

“Maybe, I’ll never have a millionaire’s yacht. But it would be good to have a boat with GPS, and sonar to help us fish without the fear of running into something that damages our vessel or that the motor fails. Maybe that’s asking too much. But in the rest of the world, all boats have these things,” Rama said.

Many resources here remain tight. Carpenters still make fishing boats by hand.

As winter approaches, both young and old fishermen see an increase in their daily catches, and their incomes also rise — slightly.