Bogotá restaurants using tradition, molecular gastronomy make top list

Latin America

Bogotá restaurants using tradition, molecular gastronomy make top list

Foodies around the world, if Bogotá isn’t your next destination, maybe it should be.  Four Bogotá restaurants made the list of Latin America’s 50 top eateries published by the British magazine Restaurant

CGTN’s Michelle Begue has more on how Colombia’s capital is becoming a Mecca for fine dining.

Bogotá restaurants using tradition, molecular gastronomy make top list

Foodies around the world, if Bogotá isn’t your next destination, maybe it should be. Four Bogotá restaurants made the list of Latin America’s 50 top eateries published by the British magazine Restaurant.

In the kitchen of her flagship restaurant, Leo, you can see celebrity chef Leonor Espinosa’s love of anthropology, art and the environment—all expressed in her creations.

Leonor uses special ingredients from the Andes, like the Chachafruto, considered a miracle fruit in the Americas, because of its nutritional value.

Her modern twist on Colombian gastronomical traditions has won her wide recognition. According to a list sponsored by San Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, Leo is considered one the 50 best restaurants in Latin America.

In recent years, Colombia has invested much more in gastronomical ventures. Tourists and locals can find a wide variety of cafés and restaurants in Bogotá neighborhoods like ‘Zona G’—The ‘G’ stands for gourmet.

Restaurants like El Cielo focus on molecular gastronomy. Each plate is a chance to experience the physical and chemical transformation of ingredients when cooked.

While there are a wide variety of cuisines for the inquisitive palette, one food expert says Colombia has to work on its unique culinary identity.

“There aren’t that many proposals that show the Colombian territory. It is happening, and it will continue to grow, but it is not at the scale of other culinary cities like Mexico City and Lima,” food expert Liliana Lopez said.

Colombian-born Leonor is changing that. She says she loves Colombian cuisine, because of its diversity and potential for growth.

“The traditional recipes that are in our collective memory and then those recipes that are part of subcultures that we have absorbed. And Colombia also has species that never have been used in the kitchen,” Espinosa said.

As Colombia gains recognition as a fine dining destination, satisfied customers say they hope Bogotá will continue on its path of self-discovery in the kitchen.

Celebrity Chef Leonor Espinosa shows Columbian gastronomical traditions

Celebrity Chef Leonor Espinosa shows Colombian gastronomical traditions

Chef Leonor Espinosa shows how she uses ingredients native to Colombia to create dishes promoting the gastronomical traditions of the people of the country.