Trump and Kim commit to work on complete Korean peninsula denuclearization

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U.S. President Donald Trump, right, reaches to shakes hands with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island Tuesday, June 12, 2018 in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump and DPRK leader Kim Jong Un signed a joint statement in Singapore committing to security guarantees. They also pledging to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. The deal, however, is short on specifics.

CGTN’s Sean Callebs reports.

A year ago, the U.S. threatened a preemptive military strike against Kim Jong Un ‘s nation. Now, they sit side-by-side, a burgeoning relationship. In many ways, it was a chance for the DPRK leader to say something to the world.

“Today, we had a historic meeting , and decided to leave the past behind,” said Kim Jong Un.

This handout photo taken on June 12, 2018 and released by The Straits Times shows North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un (L) shaking hands with US President Donald Trump (R) as they meet for the historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore. (AFP PHOTO / THE STRAITS TIMES / Kevin LIM)

President Trump relished his time in the spotlight and was embracing the chance to move relations forward in a positive way with the longtime U.S. enemy. Both leaders agreed to what they are calling as a joint statement.

“It was not easy to get here,” said Kim.

Kim mothballed his nuclear weapons program, as well as the missile system capable of carrying warheads. President Trump was beaming as he told journalists he got what he came for.

U.S. President Donald Trump answers questions about the summit with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un during a press conference at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island Tuesday, June 12, 2018 in Singapore. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

“Chairman Kim and I just signed a joint statement in which he reaffirmed his unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” said Trump. “We also agreed to vigorous negotiations to implement the agreement as soon as possible.”

But the U.S. press corps, often Trump’s harshest critics as time and again, had to ask:n Did Kim Jong Un agree?

“Only a person that dislikes like Donald Trump would say that I have agreed to make a big commitment. It takes a long time scientifically. You have to wait certain periods of time, and a lot of things happen. But despite that, once you start the process, it means it is pretty much over,” Trump said.

Trump said the U.S. is ending joint military operations in the region with the Republic of Korea, now that in his words, Kim is promising denuclearization of the DPRK. Trump countered accusations he gave up too much to Kim. He was adamant that punishing economic sanctions will stay in place until Pyongyang is well down the road to denuclearization.

President Trump also said he is reaching out to leaders in the region, including South Korean  President Moon Jae-In, and China’s President Xi Jinping. He will also be seeking help from China and the Republic of Korea to hold Kim Jong Un accountable.

A man walks past a mural depicting North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Monday, June 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

One other obvious question was what would be the best way to go forward. Trump indicated that U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo could be holding talks with the DPRK as early as next week. When asked if Kim Jong Un is coming to Washington, D.C., or Trump to Pyongyang , the U.S. president said absolutely…but at the appropriate time.


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