Despite economic crisis, there’s a positive forecast for Brazil’s organic farms

Global Business

Organic food is proving it can make a difference in Brazil’s economy. The country’s been struggling to spur growth in most industries, except for the organic farming industry.

CCTV America’s Paulo Cabral reports from Brazil.

Despite economic crisis, there's a positive forecast for Brazil\'s organic farms

Organic food is proving it can make a difference in Brazil's economy. The country's been struggling to spur growth in most industries, except for the organic farming industry. CCTV America's Paulo Cabral reports from Brazil. As the economic crisis deepens in Brazil, a number of retail businesses counted their losses. But some were counting their blessings. According to a Brazilian government survey, sales of organic products grew by 35 percent last year. And the forecast for this year is for another 30 percent growth. In organic farming, workers have to manually remove the weeds that grow around the green cabbage. In conventional farming, chemicals would be used to get rid of them. Organic farmers said this kind of intensive labor is what makes their product more expensive. Despite the higher prices, there's no shortage of consumers. Silva sells his produce at a farmer's market in Sao Paulo and delivers baskets of organic products to customers' houses. It's a market driven by a growing interest in sustainability and healthy eating, particularly among the middle and upper classes. Producers said the price difference between organic and conventional food has reduced over the past few years, but it's still expensive. So at least for now the organic market is expanding, but for those who can afford it.

As the economic crisis deepens in Brazil, a number of retail businesses counted their losses. But some were counting their blessings.

According to a Brazilian government survey, sales of organic products grew by 35 percent last year. And the forecast for this year is for another 30 percent growth.

In organic farming, workers have to manually remove the weeds that grow around the green cabbage. In conventional farming, chemicals would be used to get rid of them. Organic farmers said this kind of intensive labor is what makes their product more expensive.

Despite the higher prices, there’s no shortage of consumers.

Silva sells his produce at a farmer’s market in Sao Paulo and delivers baskets of organic products to customers’ houses.

It’s a market driven by a growing interest in sustainability and healthy eating, particularly among the middle and upper classes.

Producers said the price difference between organic and conventional food has reduced over the past few years, but it’s still expensive. So at least for now the organic market is expanding, but for those who can afford it.