The Heat discusses Mexico’s drug cartels and ongoing violence

The Heat

For years, violent drug cartels have terrorized large parts of Mexico. Armed with sophisticated weapons, they are engaged in major drug trafficking and other illegal activities. It’s estimated that more than 80,000 people have been killed since Mexico launched a war on the cartels in 2006 and thousands more have been kidnapped, some have even been beheaded. Amid all the violence, the Mexico has also faced allegations of government and police corruption. Journalists have dared to cover these issues are often murdered.

CCTV America’s Franc Contreras reported this story from Mexico.

The Heat discusses Mexico's drug cartels and ongoing violence

For years, violent drug cartels have terrorized large parts of Mexico. Armed with sophisticated weapons, they are engaged in major drug trafficking and other illegal activities. It's estimated that more than 80,000 people have been killed since Mexico launched a war on the cartels in 2006 and thousands more have been kidnapped, some have even been beheaded. Amid all the violence, the Mexico has also faced allegations of government and police corruption. Journalists have dared to cover these issues are often murdered.

The Heat spoke to one of Mexico’s leading investigative journalists, Anabel Hernandez who has covered Mexico’s drug cartels for years. Her life has been threatened and despite having armed security, was forced to flee Mexico and now lives in California. She is the author of Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and their Godfathers.

Journalist Anabel Hernandez discusses cartel violence in Mexico

The Heat spoke to one of Mexico’s leading investigative journalists, Anabel Hernandez who has covered Mexico’s drug cartels for years. Her life has been threatened and despite having armed security, was forced to flee Mexico and now lives in California. She is the author of Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and their Godfathers.

Mexican government officials have previously denied corruption allegations. The Heat interviewed a panel of experts about the ongoing violence and what Mexico is doing to combat the cartels.

* Alejandro Hope, an independent security analyst who has held positions with Mexico’s intelligence agency.

* Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Washington DC-based Wilson Center.

Alejandro Hope and Duncan Wood discuss corruption in Mexico

Mexican government officials have previously denied corruption allegations. The Heat interviewed a panel of experts about the ongoing violence and what Mexico is doing to combat the cartels.

The Mexican government is still searching for 43 missing students who are feared killed.

Investigators say a former mayor and his wife ordered local police to stop a group of student teachers from disrupting a political event back in September. The case sparked mass protests against the government which is accused of not doing enough.

Where are these students and why did they disappear? We take a look, this week on America’s Now, Sunday 6pm EST.