Egyptian Elections and the Fate of the Muslim Brotherhood

The Heat

Supporters of Egyptian presidential candidate and former army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi Supporters of Egyptian presidential candidate and former army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi

Egyptians voted this week for a new President, ten months after the ousting of Mohamed Morsi. The Heat takes a look at the economic and security challenges facing Egypt’s next leader and explore the future of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Uncertainty in Egypt as 53-million registered voters head to the polls to elect a new leader.
Will a former Army chief be the next President of Egypt– and can stability be restored in the region?

Retired Field Marshal Abdel Fattah al-Sisi– campaigned under the slogan “Long Live Egypt” and if he wins this week’s presidential election, as most polls suggest, he will be called on to restore security and revive the economy.

His only challenger in the race, leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahy, has also promised Egyptians a better life with the creation of new jobs, housing and health care.

Whoever is announced the next leader of Egypt faces a huge challenge of rebuilding a nation that’s faced turmoil over the last three years.

CCTV’s Adel el-Mahrouky reports from Cairo.
Follow Adel ELMahrouky on Twitter @AdelMahrouky

What is in Store for the Future President of Egypt?

What is in Store for the Future President of Egypt?

Retired Field Marshal Abdel Fattah al-Sisi campaigned under the slogan "Long Live Egypt" and if he wins this wee's presidential election, as most polls suggest, he will be called on to restore security and revive the economy. His only challenger in the race, leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahy, has also promised Egyptians a better life with the creation of new jobs, housing and health care. Whoever is announced the next leader of Egypt faces a huge challenge of rebuilding a nation that's faced turmoil over the last three years. CCTV's Robert Nagila reports from Cairo.

Since the Arab Spring in 2011, Egypt has been embroiled in turmoil. Hundreds have been killed and thousands of members of the Muslim Brotherhood have been arrested.

A survey by the Pew Research Center found a majority of Egyptians are dissatisfied with their country’s direction. In fact, 54 percent said having a stable government is more important than democracy. While 44-percent said democracy remains a priority.
Joining us to talk about the enormous task the next president faces is Imam Shaker Elsayed of the Dar al-Hijrah Mosque in Falls Church, Virginia and from Chicago, Sahar Mohamed Khamis, an Assistant Professor with the University of Maryland.

Egyptian Elections Guest Panel (part I)

Egyptian Elections Guest Panel (part I)

A survey by the Pew Research Center found a majority of Egyptians are dissatisfied with their country's direction. In fact, 54% have said having a stable government is more important than democracy, while 44% said democracy remains a priority. Imam Shaker Elsayed of the Dar al-Hijrah Mosque in Falls Church, Virginia and Doctor Sahar Khamis, an Assistant Professor with the University of Maryland join Anand Naidoo to discuss the enormous task the president faces.

This week, Egyptians returned to the polls to select a new president. Last July, President Mohamed Morsi was removed from power during a military takeover after widespread street protests.

The Muslim Brotherhood which dominated the first free election has now been outlawed and branded a terrorist group.

We continue our conversation now with Sahar Mohamed Khamis and Imam Shaker Elsayed about how the fate of the Muslim Brotherhood may be changed.

Egyptian Elections Guest Panel (part II)

Egyptian Elections Guest Panel (part II)

Anand Naidoo continues his conversation with Doctor Sahar Khamis and Imam Shaker Elsayed by discussing the fate of the Muslim Brotherhood after last year's widespread street protests and subsequent military takeover.