The Heat discusses possible turning point in fight against ISIL

The Heat

When a Jordanian fighter-pilot was burned alive in a cage by ISIL, many in the Arab world reacted with outrage and condemnation. Jordan vowed to avenge his death and has since launched a series of military strikes against ISIL targets. Could this be a turning point in the war against the militant Islamic group that now controls major parts of Iraq and Syria?

Several Arab states including Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Jordan are already part of a U.S. led coalition fighting ISIL. But does the conflict require more than just a military response? Should Arab states take the lead and play a central role in helping to defeat ISIL?

The Heat debated the issue with three experts:

  • Mamoun Abu Nowar, a former Jordanian Air Force general and a political and military analyst.
  • Tawfik Hamid, a former extremist from Egypt, now an Islamic thinker and reformer.
  • Phyllis Bennis, a writer and long-time analyst on Middle East issues and the director of the new internationalism project at the Institute for Policy Studies.

The Heat discusses possible turning point in fight against ISIL

When a Jordanian fighter-pilot was burned alive in a cage by ISIL, many in the Arab world reacted with outrage and condemnation. Jordan vowed to avenge his death and has since launched a series of military strikes against ISIL targets. Could this be a turning point in the war against the militant Islamic group that now controls major parts of Iraq and Syria? Several Arab states including Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Jordan are already part of a U.S. led coalition fighting ISIL. But does the conflict require more than just a military response? Should Arab states take the lead and play a central role in helping to defeat ISIL?

The debate continues:

Mamoun Abu Nowar, Tawfik Hamid, Phyllis Bennis discuss fight against ISIL

When a Jordanian fighter-pilot was burned alive in a cage by ISIL, many in the Arab world reacted with outrage and condemnation. Jordan vowed to avenge his death and has since launched a series of military strikes against ISIL targets. Could this be a turning point in the war against the militant Islamic group that now controls major parts of Iraq and Syria? Several Arab states including Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Jordan are already part of a U.S. led coalition fighting ISIL. But does the conflict require more than just a military response? Should Arab states take the lead and play a central role in helping to defeat ISIL?