The Heat: Australian immigration reforms

The Heat

The Heat: Australian immigration reforms A man leaves the Department of Immigration and Border Protection offices in Sydney, Thursday, April 20, 2017. Australia plans to tighten its citizenship rules to require higher English language skills, longer residency and evidence of integration such as a job. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

Australia, with its long history of immigration, claims to be the most successful multicultural society in the world.

Since 1945, over 7 million immigrants have flowed into Australia from more than 200 countries, and about 27 percent of its population is foreign born.

But now, in part because of security concerns, it is tightening citizenship requirements. And the Prime Minister has also announced the abolition of his country’s skilled worker visa program.

To take an indepth look at these new laws and who they could affect Australia:

  • Linda Kirk, an expert on migration law and is a senior lecturer at Australia National University
  • Shen Narayanasamy, Human Rights Campaign director with the activist group GetUp!
  • Adam Creighton, a journalist with The Australian
  • Cameron Stewart, associate editor in the United States for The Australian

The Heat: Australian immigration reforms Pt 1

Australia moves to toughen its citizenship requirements and change its visa program. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said it’s all part of putting “Australia first.” To take an indepth look at these new laws and who they could affect Australia is Linda Kirk, an expert on migration law and is a senior lecturer at Australia National University, Shen Narayanasamy, Human Rights Campaign director with the activist group GetUp!, Adam Creighton, a journalist with The Australian and Cameron Stewart, associate editor in the United States for The Australian.

The Heat: Australian immigration reforms Pt 2

To take an indepth look at these new laws and who they could affect Australia is Linda Kirk, an expert on migration law and is a senior lecturer at Australia National University, Shen Narayanasamy, Human Rights Campaign director with the activist group GetUp!, Adam Creighton, a journalist with The Australian and Cameron Stewart, associate editor in the United States for The Australian.